@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl
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skullgiver

@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl

Giver of skulls

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skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

I think that’s judt Microsoft OneNote. I think other people use Notion for that sort of thing. There are also a few open source projects like that, but I’m not sure how good they are in comparison. Though, the mockup image shows some kind of clickbait collector that’s probably closer to Mozilla’s Pocket in terms of functionality.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

The command shows you have version 2.8 installed from the Mint repositories, but whatever you’re trying to install through APT wants a much lower version (it appears to want the old version that ships with Ubuntu, 2.2). The software you’re trying to apt install isn’t designed to work with the library versions Mint comes with.

That said, as others have said before, installing through APT won’t fix your Flatpak issue. Your APT problem and your Flatpak problem are completely separate. I believe there is a conflict between libxapp1 (the package Mint uses) and xapp (the package Ubuntu uses). Trying to force the Ubuntu package will break your system updates and possibly programs that worked before.

As for the warning message: it’ shouldn’t be the cause for your Flatpaks to fail entirely. The xapp library required is supposed to be included in the Flatpak application itself, so no amount of installing APT software will clear up these warnings. Luckily, many of these warning messages can be safely ignored, unless they’re printed in bold red or start with “Error:”.

If you run an Nvidia card, you may be running into a quirk of their driver. For reasons presumably only clear to Nvidia, 3D acceleration tends to die after installing a driver update, but only in some cases. If you have an Nvidia card, try rebooting, updating, and rebooting again; this tends to fix weird issues for me. On other GPU platforms you can try to do the same, but in my experience neither AMD nor Intel require these reboots to maintain functionality.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

Your block settings are stored in your account settings, on the server side, unless you use an app that chooses to store that stuff locally (i.e. on Lemmy where many servers haven’t upgraded to a version that does per-user instance blocking).

Any ActivityPub server can choose what servers to federate with and what servers’ content to show. If your current server isn’t moderated to your liking, you can switch to a server that’s more in line with what you expect.

If there are no servers that have the right moderation properties, you’ll have to find like-minded people and set up your own server, where you can block entire servers for you and your friends rather than relying on an admin to do that job for you.

You can block 99% of cartoon penises by disabling NSFW. On Mastodon and similar apps, many people are using content warnings with additional context, but this is not built into Lemmy unfortunately.

As for spammers, that’s just basic moderation, it happens on every platform. The difference between Facebook and the Fediverse is that the Fediverse doesn’t have many dedicated full time moderators, and no fancy spam detection algorithms to automatically hide reported posts. There are scripts to help admins fight spam, but they’re not 100% effective.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

Any instance admin can see deleted comments, and even restore them on their local instance.

I think most Lemmy servers with moderators would defederate from you if you abuse this, but there’s nothing stopping you from setting up your own instance where you’re in control.

If you're making software for actual end-users, you HAVE to give it a goddamn GUI, or else you suck, your software sucks, and nobody is going to use your damn software.

You see this shit SO much more often than you would think. And the infuriating thing is, it seems to be most common among programs that are INCREDIBLY complex and sophisticated....

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

Command line software isn’t for your average end user, I agree with that. If you expect your user to be able use the command line, you’re targeting a tech-adept niche audience. That doesn’t make the software bad, unless it claims to be usable by anyone. It just means that most people won’t be able to use it, and that’s fine.

If you don’t like the free software people give you, you’re free to buy or build your own. If you don’t want to use the terminal, that’s okay! You can buy software from someone else who does the same thing in a GUI, or hire someone to make a GUI wrapper around the program you’ve bought. You could even ask for a refund if the program isn’t as easy to use as it said on the website.

Of course, nobody is going to care about what you want if you’re taking the stuff other people make for free. Complaining online doesn’t make anyone interested in uploading that .exe to Github that you’ve been demanding. Get your shit together and pay someone to do the work for you.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

I don’t get it. If you remember the days of visual basic, why not grab Gambas and make your own GUI? Hell, you can still run Visual Basic 6 on modern versions of Windows. All you need to do is add a few buttons that add a bunch of command line arguments, you’ll only need to read the documentation just once!

Even if I’m getting the software for free

Lol. Lmao even.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

To be fair, Visual Studio is as easy to use as it’s ever been. If you want a Windows Forms application, it’s pretty easy to make those god awful UIs that the 90s were known for.

Unfortunately for choosing beggars, most free software development doesn’t happen on Windows, and the free alternatives (Qt Creator, Gnome Builder, etc.) are all more complicated than what Microsoft produced. Gambas comes close, but it’s stuck with some kind of VB6 derived language and a bunch of potential GPL licensing issues.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

They’re kind of right, though. Basic interaction with ActivityPub even on a small server causes a storm of HTTP requests. It’s not very efficient, but efficiency has been sacrificed to allow for easier decentralisation.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

The internet is full of designer drugs. Opioids are pretty basic, not thst hard to produce, and available on a mass market scale, though, you don’t need new development for those.

Party drugs, like MDMA, have tons of “experimental” formulae and are available online wherever local laws aren’t prepared to ban them. The side effects are usually the thing people are taking the drugs for in the first place. You want to mess with certain receptors inside the brain, that’s the whole point, and for healthy people, normal doses won’t even have side effects that severe. Whatever drug you may design, people will become resistant to it, start taking more, and overdose.

I don’t think AI is necessary for any of this. The hard part isn’t designing drugs, it’s more about setting up efficient production facilities.

skullgiver, (edited )
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

You can configure Linux to automatically log you in after decrypting the disk. You can also configure Linux to automatically unlock the disk through a TPM. However, like on consumer versions of Windows, this doesn’t require authentication like a fingerprint.

I have no idea how to do it on Zorin, though. There are guides online about how to do it, but they’re not written for Zorin’s target audience (Linux beginners, mostly).

I think you’re right that this stuff should be easier. However, Linux lacks proper integration between the biometrics system and the TPM that Windows and MacOS have, so what you want is technically very difficult at the moment. Unfortunately, the phobia many Linux people have for technologies like TPMs will probably make it take a while before such features will be available.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

On other operating systems, biometrics allow you to unlock the disk (through the TPM) and immediately authenticate you on boot. I don’t think an encrypted home directory will help OP.

I’m not aware of any Linux implementation of this system. I should also say that this is terribly broken on Windows, with any attacker being able to add their own fingerprints into the key store using an alternative boot drive, because every version of the spec is implemented horribly insecurely.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

Windows can use biometrics to unlock the TPM and authenticate the user with just one single fingerprint touch. Authentication platforms like Windows Hello use the TPM to authenticate the user, which means the TPM PIN can be used both as a “password” and as the unlock mechanism for Bitlocker disks.

I’m not aware of any Linux solution that will let you unlock the TPM with biometrics.

I should also add that last time I read about this system in Windows, someone checked three laptops and found three different ways in which an attacker could trick the biometrics into adding extra fingerprints, including the official Microsoft hardware.

Good enough for crackheads stealing the laptop and not having them be able to access your dick pics, not good enough for someone actually after your data.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

The TPM (trusted platform module) is a chip inside your processor (or on your motherboard) that can store cryptographic information such as encryption keys and certificates in a way that is extremely difficult to get them out without providing the proper unlock mechanism.

One method used to unlock secrets is to enter a PIN (which is alfanumeric despite the name), or by requiring an exact sequence of “measurements”. The bootloader measures “I just booted Grub”, then the kernel measures “I just started booting”, then initramfs starting is measured, etc. Combined with secure boot being configured to only boot Linux versions signed by your own key, this basically prevents the TPM from giving up its secrets unless you’ve booted the exact same operating system that stored the secure data.

These mechanisms are often combined for greater security

This automatic unlocking feature allows operating systems like Windows or Linux to encrypt the disk without ever having to enter a key. An attacker van steal the laptop, but assuming they don’t know the user password and can’t bypass the biometrics, they’ll be stuck at a secure login screen with no access to the data on disk (though LPC TPMs on the hardware can easily be eavesdropped, so this isn’t always very secure). Windows enables this mechanism by default in many configurations.

The biggest advantage is that nobody can rip out the hard drive and look at your files, nor can anyone with a boot disk just browse your files like you could back in the Windows 95-10 days.

It’s also one of the reasons Windows 11 requires modern TPMs, and doesn’t work on some relatively recent hardware without bypassing checks on the installer.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

You’d think the original source of Wookie lore (the Star Wars Holiday Special) would mention stuff like this.

I wonder where this information came from. The Fandom wiki suggests The Official Star Wars Fact File 12, but I can’t find any readable copies of that online.

Lemmy is not immune to trolls, bad fait actors or propaganda - in fact, despite how bad reddit is, a lot of Lemmy instances are worse

I’m done, I’ve been banned for expressing a different opinion (without insulting or personally attacking anyone), I’ve been accused of evading a ban with multiple accounts (this is my only account I’ve ever had on any lemmy instance), I’ve had people selectively ignore my comments and accuse me of things which I never...

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

It should be noted that instance blocking may not do what you would expect it to do. It doesn’t automatically block every interaction from a particular account on that server.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

Are you saying we should not help someone out if an abusive relationship unless they’re at danger of being murdered? Because that’s what I’m getting from this.

Abuse victims deserve support, regardless if their gender or risk of physical harm.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

Based on the statistics I could find, the domestic abuse victim numbers seem to be about 45/55% men/women. Exact statistics will differ based on your local area, of course.

Physical violence is reported much rarer by men than women (physical strength helps a lot here) but I don’t see why you would need to be seriously hurt to get help from a help line.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

The screenshot shows Mastodon falling back to their “I don’t know your format, this is the best I can come up with” rendering. There are Mastodon forks that would show the post just fine.

This is a Mastodon issue and I believe it may actually be worked on. Lemmy isn’t doing anything wrong here.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

Clippy only ever worked in office, I think Microsoft purged all Microsoft Agent software back in XP except for the dog one (the little animation you see when you search for files in XP).

There’s an SDK for Microsoft Agent compatible software. You could hook up Clippy to a voice synthesizer and ChatGPT…

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

Lots of it. People beind mad that their Mastodon posts ended up on Bluesky, mostly. There’s a Github thread that includes a recap of most of the drama.

A section of the Fediverse sees the Fediverse as a separate thing from the big companies and other social media and wants to stay isolated rather than federate as widely as possible.

It’s possible to simply not federate outside of a specified whitelist, of course, but that doesn’t seem to be what the people complaining about the bridge want either

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

To be fair you need a tool for that, unlike their option.

That’s true (at least for the phones I’ve seen), but there are still other ways. Six or seven years ago, phones had little slide-in slots attached to the motherboard that were accessible by removing the back cover of the phone, for example. There are tool-less ways this could’ve been implemented.

Fairphone on the other hand has to maintain a unique device which is way more work, they get early access because of that though.

This is true, which is why they bought the worse IoT SoC instead of a nornal mobile chip, but they do get access to patches and source code way ahead of volunteer projects like LineageOS and Graphene and still tend to lag behind in terms of releases. I can forgive them for major Android releases, but not for the security updates

And their noncompliance with all the GrapheneOS security demands is the reason I dont use it.

I think most of their demands are quite reasonable, really. “Provide an update for the bug that allows any app to become root/any nearby Bluetooth device to execute code as root within a month” doesn’t seem that unreasonable to me, and neither does “actually patch all the vulnerabilities known up till know”. The TEE stuff is also something a lot secure software relies on.

I guess it’s the Fairphone, not the Securephone. And then again, nobody cares about security anyway. It just adds context to the promised eight years of software support: you get support, but do you get all of the support? Do you gain anything above flashing LineageOS to a different device?

Fairphone is Google certified and thus needs to ship unmodified Android including all the Google crap

Samsung is Google certified and they don’t. They opted to use Google’s skin, with Google’s launcher and a bunch of Google extras rather than develop their own. They don’t need to do that, they just aren’t allowed to modify Google’s launcher if they choose to use Google’s launcher.

I like the idea behind /e/ but their software updates have been lacking.

Regular phones dont get 8 years of updates so they will be outdated and should not be used.

Shouldn’t they? Most people I know don’t give a shit about security updates. Apps still work, browsers still get updated. Someone like me would flash a custom ROM, others would just keep using their Android 9 phone until it no longer works some day. And to be honest, as long as you update your browser, there’s not really that big a risk of getting hacked on Android. That, and the ability to install 'your WhatsApp is outdated click here to install WhatsApp 2024.apk".

There are people thst shouldn’t use old phones (human rights activists, journalists, people in important positions within big companies) but they probably shouldn’t be using Android in the first place, especially not from a company that doesn’t have the capacity to focus on security like Google and Apple can.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

LTT have high praise to the ability to replace the individual components in the Framework, like the trackpad and the screen.

I guess laptops are seen in a different light compared to phones, but I don’t think they should be. Not anymore.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

Their actual experiences are what matters.

In that case, wouldn’t the experience be “this is as slow as my old phone”, “the bezels are rather large”, “this thing is super heavy”, “why do I need to charge my phone already”, and “why is it so thick”?

Price isn’t everything, but the 800 dollar segment comes with certain expectations. The Fairphone is a decidedly mid-range phone with a high-end price tag. There are real benefits to that price (the long support and the ethical superiority, for example), but I don’t think consumers really care about that stuff enough not to be disappointed.

Maybe it’s because I don’t have the kind of disposable income to overlook these issues, but I don’t think I would be very satisfied with the Fairphone myself. My current phone is closing in on 4½ years of usage, but it cost just over half the price of a new Fairphone at launch. I don’t think the SoC will be able to keep up with another four years of updates, but the new Fairphone SoC doesn’t seem much faster. I don’t think I’d spend 810 dollars on a phone with 8 years of support when I could just as easily spend 450 dollars twice for a phone that I’ll use 4½ years, and get better performance out of it as well.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

If you eject the SD card in the settings, it’ll happily take a new SD card. Just popping it out is how you get a confused OS, especially with the way Android was designed, but that’s why the eject button is there.

The SIM issue is pretty weird. I don’t know why Samsung phones don’t seem to cope with that.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

The Framework is about more than just the USB bays. They’re also designed to have non-hotswappable repairs for things like the touchpad, the screen, the keyboard, and all kinds of other components that are impossible to replace on other laptops. And there are actually some upgrades you can do to the Fairphone 4, though I don’t think I would bother with the ones they offer if I had one.

The original framework didn’t have motherboard upgrades, those came later. It was lauded for its openness and repairability, but the repairability doesn’t seem to be any better than the Fairphone’s. You can swap the battery, add storage, replace the (web)cam, swap the screen, all without complicated tools, but i think the only real difference is that the Fairphone doesn’t have a removable SSD and RAM package. You can’t upgrade a framework’s CPU without replacing the entire motherboard with it, for instance. Almost everything the Framework was lauded for on launch has been the default on Fairphones for years now, so I think the comparison is quite apt.

I don’t think I’ve used an early 2000s phone where you could replace the camera without a soldering iron, or get access to the screen without breaking the chassis plastic. The replaceable stuff always seemed like a marketing gimmick to me.

The Fairphone has one practical repairability advantage: they promise to keep parts in stock. I could happily get another year or two out of my current phone, but there are no more replacement screens or batteries to be found anywhere. The same was true back in the 2000s; phones with replaceable batteries, skins and back panels would show up, but two years later no shop would stock any of that stuff.

Unfortunately, the modular phones died, because the few phones that did offer modules completely failed. It’s just not viable to create a fully modular device in this form factor.

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