@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

Kalcifer

@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works

All of this user’s content is licensed under CC BY 4.0.

This profile is from a federated server and may be incomplete. Browse more on the original instance.

Kalcifer,
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

Would you mind pointing out examples of them boycotting the software? From what I saw in their comment history, it was mostly them talking about moving away from centralization on lemmy.ml.

Kalcifer, (edited )
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

Local Only Communities

Local communities are an interesting concept, though I am concerned about unintended side effects. I have noticed many times that people from other instances chime in to meta-communities to provide some alternative viewpoints and context when instances are discussing interactions with the rest of the network. I worry that some will become too isolated/sheltered. But I suppose, in the end, that’s ultimately up to the individual instances to decide.


Lemmy can now federate with Wordpress, Discourse and NodeBB.

Increased federation capabilities is always awesome to see!


In order to improve interoperability with Mastodon and other microblogging platforms, Lemmy now automatically includes a hashtag with new posts. The hashtag is based on the community name, so posts to /c/lemmy will automatically have the hashtag #lemmy. This makes Lemmy posts much easier to discover.

This is a clever solution. I think this is a good way to go about it.


RSS feeds now include post thumbnail and embedded images.Security

I really appreciate the continued attention given to keep RSS alive.


A security audit was recently performed on Lemmy.

Awesome! And congrats!


  • Added Community local_subscribers count
  • Support for custom post thumbnail
  • Indicate to user when they are banned from community
  • Added alt_text for image posts

Great features for improving the polish and user experience on Lemmy!

Kalcifer, (edited )
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

I don’t believe that defederation is necessary nor wise. The complaints about Lemmy.ml that I’ve seen have generally revolved around how they moderate their instance and how communities they host are moderated. If one doesn’t like how they moderate their communities, then one should be the change that they wish to see — start a replacement community, nurture it, and try to make it better than what was seen on lemmy.ml. This is the beauty of the fediverse — you aren’t forced to utilize anything on any other instance. And if one really dislikes seeing lemmy.ml users, then they can even block the instance themself. Lemmy.ml provides a steady, and considerable amount of traffic and content to the Lemmyverse. While that isn’t an argument for continuing to use their communities, it is an argument for why it would be unwise to fragment the network by defederating from them.

The only time that an instance should consider defederating from another, imo, is if it finds that users from other instances are violating the local rules at a rate higher than what is possible, or economically viable to handle via administrative action. It shouldn’t be a simple matter of passive difference in opinion.

Kalcifer,
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

I’ll preface this by saying that this isn’t an argument in favor of the imperial system, nor is it an argument intending to detract from the usefulness of the metric system. But I have wondered if there is some merit to having a simple, colloquial, “human friendly” system of measurement — something that’s shown to be the best system for people to grok, and is the most convenient to use in day-to-day life. If you need precision, and well defined standards, then certainly use the metric system, but is the metric system easy for people to grok? Say you ask someone to estimate a length. Would they be more likely to accurately estimate the length using the metric system, the imperial system, or some other system? Likewise for telling someone a length and asking them to physically reproduce it. Would they be more likely to do so with the metric system, the imperial system, or some other? It’s an interesting problem, imo, and it doesn’t seem to get much attention.

It could very well be that people can, indeed, grok measurements the best when using the metric system, but I currently am unaware of any research that has been done to show that. If anyone is aware of any research that has looked into this, then please let me know! I’d be very interested to read it.

Kalcifer,
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

FreshRSS supports HTTP authentication, and there’s an open issue for adding OAuth support.

Kalcifer, (edited )
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

Without it being open source and not providing reproducible builds, the privacy claims are borderline weightless.

When responding to a comment with multiple points, should one create a new thread (new comment) for each point, or should one make a single large comment containing individual responses to all points?

I encounter situations like this rather often where I am responding to a comment that contains many individual points/statements. I typically will respond with a single comment that contains a quote of each point that is being responded to with my response under neath the respective quote — and, sometimes, for added clarity, a...

Kalcifer,
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

I’ve unfortunately seen that behavior here on Lemmy as well.

Kalcifer,
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

Making multiple replies to the same thing is considered rude and spammy.

I’m just wondering if it’s a practice/belief that should be continued. Perhaps multiple replies is actually a better way to do it, regardless of how it is currently interpreted.

Kalcifer, (edited )
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

If the conversation is at the point where you are replying to replies, and you’ve sent me three rebuttals with each of them asking for clarification or verification from me, I’m now sending 3-6 replies back, which may require you to send 12 or more.

You are right that the amount of comments would grow rather quickly (exponentially, I think), but the threads, themselves, should be easier to follow — there wouldn’t be multiple conversations happening within each comment.


I’d lose track of who said what and would end up referencing something from a conversation with someone else.

How come? The comments are all visually tied together in the thread hierarchy (well, assuming that one isn’t reading Lemmy content from Mastodon, or with the Chat mode in the Lemmy UI)

Kalcifer, (edited )
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

It just clutters things up

How so? Are you just referring to the sheer number of comments as being clutter? I would argue that it’s cleaner as there is less of a need of large comments and extensive utilization of quotes. Ideally, one comment would receive one direct reply without any extra formatting.


It […] makes referencing the points and counter-points later more difficult if they’re all spread out in multiple replies instead of just 1.

How so? Everything is still contained in a threaded hierarchy (assuming that one isn’t using something like Mastodon, or Lemmy-UI’s Chat feature in the comment section). If the comments are contained within scope/context, relevant information to the thread shouldn’t be spread out. The relevant information should be contained within the path of the n-ary tree.

Kalcifer, (edited )
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

It is rare for any signle point in an opinion to stand on its own as an atomic unit.

But if it does, wouldn’t it be better for it to be its own comment?


A reader would need to jump through a thread to follow your line of reasoning in its entirety.

But isn’t that what already happens? The only specific relevant difference is that, currently each comment in the thread could contain any number of individual arguments happening simultaneously.


it is the mutual reinforcement of several points in agreement with each other that will educate or convince someone.

This is a fair point — I hadn’t considered this.

Kalcifer, (edited )
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

Progressivism isn’t mutually exclusive with liberals nor tankies. A progressive is simply someone who advocates for change. Likewise, a conservative is someone who advocates for stasis.

Kalcifer,
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

Manufacturing and boot processes have to be modified to make sure nothing leaks out and everything stays put.

Meaning that software like systemd-crytpenroll would need to be updated to support this? I suppose what I’m trying to ask is this: As a user, if I want to set up full disk encryption using a TPM (1.2 or 2.0?) module, would I need to do anything different/novel during installation if I wanted to ensure that the bus is encrypted? And, if so, what would I need to do?

Kalcifer,
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

How do you mean?

Kalcifer, (edited )
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

When did they start adding noise to low speed EVs?

At least 2016 (in the USA) [source (archive)].

Kalcifer,
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

wat

Kalcifer,
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

That’s a fair question regarding clarity — the authors of the study touched on this in the “Strengths and weaknesses of the study” section:

Before we can infer that E-HE vehicles pose a greater risk to pedestrians than ICE vehicles, we must consider whether our study is free from confounding and selection bias. Confounding occurs when the exposure and outcome share a common cause. Confounders in this study would be factors that may both cause a traffic collision and also cause the exposure (use of an E-HE car). Younger, less experienced drivers (ie, ages 16–24) are more likely to be involved in a road traffic collision and are also more likely to own an electric car. Some of the observed increased risk of electric cars may therefore be due to younger drivers preferring electric cars. This would cause positive confounding, meaning that the true relative risk of electric cars is less than we have estimated in our study.

The study is technically looking at the unit of driver and vehicle, rather than only the driver or only the vehicle, so the results could potentially be different if the driver and car are viewed as a unit rather than separate.

Kalcifer,
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

I don’t click on clickbait i’m absolutely sure it’s misleading or wrong.

Well, if you didn’t click on it, then you can’t be sure ­— it’s just a presumption.

If someone has a valid point, tone it way down, i don’t expect anything serious out of it.

How do you mean?

Kalcifer, (edited )
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

most people in conversation about US politics don’t use liberal that way. The word has evolved from the meaning you prescribe to it.

Hm — it feels like more of an uneducated misappropriation than an evolution of the term. Funnily enough, when the “right wing” types use it with a negative connotation, it really doesn’t paint them in a good light — they are speaking negatively of things that they posture themselves as being in support of.


If someone (consciously or unconsciously) decides they will peg their beliefs on the center of the Overton Window that is fundamentally a different thing than taking a set of ethics, morals, and policy knowledge and building a political perspective from the ground up.

Sure, I agree. Keep in mind that the latter can still place one in the Overton Window, though.


Centrists by and large are ideological cowards

Why? They just have beliefs that put them in the center of the left/right dichotomy. Is one a coward for not being polarized? This point is almost moot, though — centrism is rather nebulous and ephemeral.

Kalcifer,
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

Government roads don’t force users to do anything but rather empower citizens.

Another argument for why government roads are ethical is because they fight off monopolization — property ownership is at high risk for monopolization. I’m not sure if the Georgist idea of taxing the land value that a private road would be on is enough.

Kalcifer,
@Kalcifer@sh.itjust.works avatar

I think we seem to have different understandings of what “libertarian” means.

From my experience, it certainly feels common that people tend to have different definitions and/or misunderstandings of libertarianism.

I think that libertarian is simply the opposite of authoritarian

I take issue with the usage of the word “simply” — I advise against such types of reductionism. That being said, the comparison gets kind of tricky when one considers the different variants/offshoots of libertarianism, or other freedom/liberty oriented political philosophies. It’s tempting to try and reduce political philosophies to a point on a 2D plane, like the political compass, or, worse, a 1D line, like the left/right dichotomy, but it’s often quite a bit more complex — thinking in terms of absolute “opposites” can lead one down the wrong path. That being said, without being overly pedantic, libertarianism can be thought of as in opposition to authoritarianism.

little to do with taxes or other economic stuff.

While it may be possible that a definition of libertarianism doesn’t directly reference economic topics, they still arise as a dependency or result. Economics and politics are often tightly intertwined.

  • All
  • Subscribed
  • Moderated
  • Favorites
  • JUstTest
  • mdbf
  • ngwrru68w68
  • cubers
  • magazineikmin
  • thenastyranch
  • rosin
  • khanakhh
  • InstantRegret
  • Youngstown
  • slotface
  • Durango
  • kavyap
  • DreamBathrooms
  • megavids
  • tacticalgear
  • osvaldo12
  • normalnudes
  • tester
  • cisconetworking
  • everett
  • GTA5RPClips
  • ethstaker
  • anitta
  • Leos
  • provamag3
  • modclub
  • lostlight
  • All magazines