@BackOnMyBS@lemmy.world
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BackOnMyBS

@BackOnMyBS@lemmy.world

I’m back on my bullshit.

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BackOnMyBS,
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I haven’t heard about this. Can you elaborate on what happened?

BackOnMyBS,
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Thank youuu!! Going through All i basically an exercise in blocking porn communities, lol

BackOnMyBS,
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Georgia woman. It was a Georgia woman that crossed into Florida. WTH is up with that headline?

BackOnMyBS,
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Why do they have to specify that he’s from Kentucky?? Why is that the identity they go with?

‘If you don’t have money to go to Europe by boat, you try to get there by starting a relationship with a tourist’: Sex tourism plagues Gambia (english.elpais.com)

Economic inequality is driving European tourists to the African country who come seeking sun, but also sex. Its government’s plans to attract ‘quality tourism’ have failed to take off...

BackOnMyBS,
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Same thing happens all over the Caribbean. In Cuba, both men and women hangout in tourist areas to try to woo tourists so that they could at the very least get some financial support, if not eventually move out of the country with their partner. While it may seem completely fake, I think the Cubans actually do develop romantic feelings for their tourist partners, despite the financial relationship. I feel that I must say that I have never been in one of these relationships nor had any romantic experiences with anyone in Cuba. I just have family over there and have visited a lot, so I get to see it from mostly the local perspective.

BackOnMyBS,
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I haven’t been since 2019, so I can’t really say how things are right now, but rather than give you my opinion on what I think about Cuba, I’d like to share my experiences to illustrate what Cuba is like.

I started going when I was in middle school back in 1995ish to visit family. At the time, the country was in a severe economic depression while relations between the US and Cuba were terrible. Traveling to Cuba was a mission that required individual approval from the federal government, particularly the Dept of the Treasury I believe, and traveling through another country. During these trips, half of my role for traveling was to take supplies and money to help my family in Cuba. Having been born and raised in the US, seeing the severe economic conditions in Cuba were impactful. Things were rough in Cuba. Acquiring basic things like food could be an endeavor. Places that sold food would often not have any, and the places that did had incredibly long lines…like hours long. Occasionally, we would be waiting in line when food would run out. If we were able to purchase food, we were limited to a small amount. Transportation was also a hassle. We mostly biked or hitchhiked everywhere. If we were traveling across town, we would take these buses they called camels. Camels were basically semi-trucks with a trailer that was a bus (picture). The lines for these could also take hours and sometimes the bus would not show up at all. If we got on, the bus was literally packed to the physical max. I’m talking about the last person to fit was pushed in by someone outside of the bus so the doors could close. Fuck safety standards. We need to get home. Of course, mostly everything was in a state of disrepair. Buildings, streets, cars, appliances…everything that was a necessity was barely working. Things that weren’t necessities were generally abandoned.

Despite this, the people were happy and welcoming. They had a sense of community and helped each other. As stated earlier, it was quite common to hitchhike with strangers as everyone was just understanding of the economic situation and helpful. People would gather together to share stories, eat together, tell jokes, share what they had, or come up with fun experiences. One time, we went to a “club”. Basically, it was what visually appeared to be an abandoned building. Someone brought over a stereo system to play music and some lights so that the place wasn’t entirely dark. There was no cover or bar…there was no exchange of money. People just gathered there. Mostly everyone brought their own drinks, but an industrial truck with a large tank in the back showed up. The tank was full of rum and people were filling water bottles with rum out of a spigot in the rear of the truck.

The struggle became an adventure, and we would make it overcoming it fun. “We have to resolve” was the motto. For example, going to the beach when Havana doesn’t have beaches. The beaches are to the east of Havana quite a ways, so getting there on foot was not feasible. How would we get there? That’s the fun part! Let’s figure it out. Perhaps we new someone in the neighborhood that was going in that direction and could get us partway there, there was a friend that worked with an employer that was taking workers near there and we could catch a ride in their bus, we could hitchhike over, or who knows what we would come up with. Once there, there isn’t anything to eat or drink, so we’d have to prepare and take everything we could possibly need. Since they had a strong sense of community, we would make all sorts of friends at the beach and have a great time. There was a communal sense of humor over the economic situation that led to many hilarious jokes, stories, and moments. Once we wanted to leave, the next mission in the adventure came up. How the hell do we get home?..and it’s starting to get dark. Perhaps some of the friends we made at the beach could help us, or we could maybe hitchhike back, or possibly a worker transportation bus/truck was driving by and out of their own goodwill was stopping near the beach to pick up anyone that wanted a ride. Seeing this sense of community despite the extreme struggle they experienced daily without end in sight had a considerable impact on my personality. It was such a stark contrast from the rugged individualism and general mistrust of strangers in the US.

Slowly, things started getting better for the Cuban people. Food and basic necessities became more available and easier to obtain to the point that it was no longer a dire situation. People could assume that they would have enough to be comfortable. Luxuries started developing as well. We could go to the ice cream parlor Coppelia and know that while they may not have the specific flavor I wanted, it was likely they would have ice cream. Taxis became more reasonably priced, the bus would come by more regularly and less full, restaurants started showing up all over the place, and some places even had air conditioning! People could sign up for excursion to go camping or visit a scenic area with friends and families. Sometimes even entire neighborhood would plan days-long excursions together, catching a train halfway across the country to vacation as an inclusive community. Old, young, disabled, single mothers…everyone was included.

Coincidentally, I developed a rash on my arm right before going to Cuba and almost cancelled my trip so that I could get seen by a doctor here in the US. However, my family talked me out of it and told me to see a doctor in Cuba. This would be my first experience with Cuban medicine, and I was hesitant due to the stories I had heard. Regardless, I tried it out. I swear to everything that I was incapable of imagining my experience until I lived it. This is how it went. We were going to do something for the day, and on the way to do that thing, we passed by a general clinic (they call them polyclinics) that happened to conveniently be on the way. Apparently, there are clinics within walking distance of mostly anywhere in Havana. We walked in and saw a nurse that was chilling at a desk. There was no line. She asked me what was up, and once I told her, she directed me to the doctor on shift. There were 2 people ahead of me, so we sat down. No more than 10 mins later, I was seeing the doctor. The dude asked me for my name and address in Cuba. He didn’t even bother to ask to see an ID, and I was forthcoming that I was a tourist from the US. Not only did that not affect my care, it made me interesting to him and we had a nice little chat. He then asked me what was going on, and I told him. They guy explained his assessment, his reasoning for his assessment, and the treatment. He gave me a paper with a prescription on it, but then told me that if I didn’t want to bother to get the medicine, there was a specific tree that was abundant in the area whose leaves I could boil and place on the rash to cure it. After that, I left. The whole thing was maybe 20 mins. We didn’t pay a penny, show any IDs or cards, nor even talk to anyone that wasn’t either a medical provider or another patient. It was simply and only just healthcare. Still, I didn’t have the treatment in my hand, only a script. However, there are pharmacies all over the place in Havana. Seriously, I would bet that most people in Havana are no more than a 5-7 min walk from a pharmacy. We went to a pharmacy in passing. The pharmacy maybe had a really quick line of less than 5 mins if that. I gave them the script and bought the cream. It was 4 Cuban pesos, which was like $0.20 in US dollars. But wait, the story gets better! We are now far from home, it’s the middle of Summer in the Caribbean, still have the rest of our day to live, and I now have a cream that must stay cool. What did we do? We seriously went up to a ~20 year old woman that was selling ice cream and drinks on the side of the road and explained the situation to her. She offered to hold the cream in her fridge/cooler and told us that she would be there until a certain time that afternoon, so we gave it to her. We did not buy anything, and there was no expectation of that. We lived our day and came back. Picked up the cream and thanked her for holding it for is. She acted like of course she held it for us. Who wouldn’t?

Last impactful experience that I will share happened in like 2017. I was in Havana and heard that one of my favorite Cuban reggaeton groups (Los 4) was performing at a concert, so we went. I was expecting the typical American concert. Sealed off, barricades, security, ticket lines, lines to enter, assigned seating…etc. Yo…we showed up, and the concert was just open to everything. They had closed off the seawall road (el Malecon), set up a stage just outside the US Special Interests Office to annoy them, and had an open air, open to the public concert. You would just walk up. That’s it. Not one barricade aside from a few near the stage to allow the concert workers to function comfortably. There were people selling beer, people brought rum and were sharing, people were dancing in the streets and chilling on the wall. I was partying, dancing, and having a great time with whomever I happened to engage with. Everyone was just living life like enjoying a concert with your community was a basic human standard that everyone deserved for existing.

These were some of experiences that just blew my American mind. Imagine a place where things like this happen, but across all of it. Not just in transportation, a club, the beach, healthcare, or a concert, but everywhere. That is what Cuba is like.

BackOnMyBS,
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If it doesn’t really harm them, then what does it matter?

BackOnMyBS,
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Am I the only one that thinks Ben has won the lottery? What am I missing??

BackOnMyBS,
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Oh god. Aside from the odd need to be extremely identical, I found them annoying in the first 5 mins. I can’t imagine having them around regularly. Wow.

What ridiculous thing can I do during the eclipse next week?

I’m going to go see the eclipse next week, and I want to video tape myself doing something ridiculous. For example, I could enact some ancient spiritual ritual or play Total Eclipse of the Heart the whole time. I’m leaning more towards the ritual since I wouldn’t be annoying everyone around me and would have time to engage...

BackOnMyBS,
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Yeah! While I didn’t get to see totality, I saw the crescent shadows under trees last time in 2017. super cool!

BackOnMyBS,
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I was the dickhead once. I was invited to a Thanksgiving dinner to a family’s house I did not know until that night. My autistic ass really did not understand dinner manners at the time since no one had taught me. The cook asked me how the turkey was, and I was proud to authentically answer, “Dry.” They then told me to put gravy on it, and everyone started laughing. I thought they were laughing at me because I was too stupid to put gravy on the turkey. Nope. Now, I think they were laughing at me because I was too stupid to know to lie and say it was good, or perhaps they thought I was a bold person. Oops! 😆

Happy autism acceptance month! 😀

BackOnMyBS,
@BackOnMyBS@lemmy.world avatar

Because the first person tricked the second person into peeing their pantsss lmaooo 🤣🤣🤣

Does anarchism fit with occupy?

I have recently found myself in debates about the fedipact and corporate influence. The fact that fedipact exists and I had the counter arguments and participants handy, was great. But there is more evil out there, mostly hierarchical thinking (up to speciecism imo) which leads to consumerism, destruction of our climate and...

BackOnMyBS,
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They’re just throwing trash, telling you what your intentions are causing you to defend yourself, which is baiting you into an antagonistic argument. I would downvote and ignore. Also, remember that you can easily block anyone. I’m gonna do that rn 🙂👍

BackOnMyBS,
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I’m in my early 40s, retired, and never even been engaged. I kinda like it tho. It’s pretty chill 🙂

BackOnMyBS,
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Do they both feel it at the same time??

BackOnMyBS,
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Thanks for sharing! I find this quite interesting as I continue to have this nagging need to establish what is the fundamental difference between autistic and NT neurotypes that result in the practical differences we experience. Do you know where I can read more about the latest science that focuses on this?

20mg sounds like quite an excessive amount. Are you sure about that? Do you have a source to support that claim?

BackOnMyBS,
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I dream every single night. When I am going through stressful periods, I journal my dreams down immediately as best as I can remember them. There is usually a symbolic meaning in them that helps me connect with myself. It’s as if my unconscious intuition is communicating with me indirectly because it doesn’t have a language center, but it still exists and can communicate with fantasy stories. I kind of think that part of me is smarter than my conscious mind in some ways too. It’s pretty observant and wise.

BackOnMyBS,
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Sorry for another “Is this autism or normal human behavior?” Post.

I don’t think you have to apologize for this. Seeking support with these situations is one of the reasons this community exists. It’s even explicitly stated in the sidebar under encouraged:

  1. Questions regarding autism.
  1. Seeking and sharing support.

Ask away!

BackOnMyBS,
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I love the physical feeling. If you see me rubbing my eyes, I’m having a great time.

Using 3 monitors, one goes completely blank on certain pages in Lemmy. How do I fix this?

If I have my browser maximized in my center monitor, whenever I go to search on Lemmy or go to my inbox and it is empty, the screen goes completely blank/black. It looks as if it lost power. If the browser is not maximized, it wont happen. This happens whether I use Chrome or Firefox. Any ideas on how to start troubleshooting?...

BackOnMyBS,
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Nope. It also happened when I was logging into google. When the password section came up, it went completely dark. Luckily, I can move the mouse to the top of the screen, click-hold, and pull down, which will un-maximize the browser, and the screen will come back on.

The video card is an GTX 1060 6GB. I don’t know when I got it exactly, but I did get it brand new sometime around 2017, so it’s about 7 years old.

BackOnMyBS,
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I can relate to some of what you’re describing. A lot of things that I know or solve just happen. I make absolutely no effort and it happens almost instantaneously. It’s extremely fast. However, if I can’t get it that way, I typically have to externalize the whole process, either by writing it down, talking to someone or myself, or acting it out. But, once I practice the information to the point that “feel it”, it turns into that super fast automatic process. People will often say that I’m smart. Even just this week, someone called me a genius. Really, I think I’m pretty dumb. I just have this ability to practice/engage in something long enough that it becomes automatic knowledge that I feel.

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